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Quality players lead to quality results

RAHS students’ Fantasy Football leagues heating up as season progresses.

By Danil Gossen

Seniors Toshi Take’, Vincent Tran, and Dylan Shaw all compete against each other in Fantasy Football.

When the NFL season started the first week of Sept. 2017, many RAHS students started competing within their own Fantasy Football leagues.

Senior Toshi Take’ initiated a gathering of RAHS students to compete in the game 2 years ago.

“Our group started a league in sophomore year after a few people expressed interest in starting one,” said Take’. “We all like football so it was natural to start a league.

The number of women playing Fantasy Football in the United States and Canada more than doubled since 2007, growing to 8.3 million in 2017, or 20% of all Fantasy Football participants, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association. This increase in women participation can be seen here at RAHS from participant and senior Helena Cassam.

“I heard about it from friends when a group was started and I was invited to join,” said Cassam, “I didn’t know very much about it to begin with, but I thought it would be fun and a good way to learn more about football and sports stats.

The explosive growth of Fantasy Football at RAHS is rooted in the ability for fans to feel a special rooting interest in a team of players that they had selected.

“It’s so competitive,” said Cassam, “people take it on as competitive[ly] as March Madness.”

The rooting gets significantly more competitive as the season progresses because there is always something on the line for the winners and losers.

“We have a small prize pool on the line as well as something the loser has to do,” said Take’.

“If you were last you could look forward to some embarrassing prank or something similar to that.”

Cassam also enjoys how Fantasy Football develops their management and social skills.

“We control our teams, and we enjoy the feeling of power that comes with managing a franchise,” said Cassam. “This independence helps me build [my] decision-making skills, so [it] contributes to the social and cognitive development.”

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