01202018 Headline:

Nurzhanov develops RAHS community with literature class and clubs

Former dean turned teacher adds STEM and diversity in RAHS community

By Alexa Villatoro

Nurzhanov works with her students during her 5th period Literature class

Last year, many students knew Nuka Nurzhanov as the Dean of Students. This year, she is the Class of 2021’s Aviation English and Computer Programming class teacher, and an advisor for Russian Club and the Girls Who Code Club.

Nurzhanov is excited to teach literature this year, as well as her other classes and clubs. She enjoys her students and the creativity and opinions they bring to class.

“I love my students; I love learning from my students,” said Nurzhanov. “I love new and fresh perspectives when students share their perspectives and their interesting ways of implementing the projects and unique creations.”

In addition to loving her students, Nurzhanov is passionate about literature. Nurzhanov wants to work on the perfect curriculum to combine that passion in the context of aerospace and aviation.

“I love literature; my favorite [genres] are European classics, Russian classics, and I love science fiction,” said Nurzhanov. “I need to be creative and to put that [literature] as a subject in the context of aerospace and aviation to share the mission of this school.”

Nurzhanov is also very excited about her Computer Programming class. She acknowledges the importance of tech skills gained from that curriculum and wants to share that with the RAHS community.

“[Computer science skills] will help you to advance your life, to get a better job, [and] to have a better career.” said Nurzhanov.

Sophomore Mollie Brombaugh goes to Nurzhanov’s Computer Science class ready for coding activities and snacks.

“She [Nurzhanov] demonstrates great motivation to learn and assist in any way she can,” said Brombaugh. “This includes bringing us snacks and encouraging us to show off our work, knowledge, and any other fun things we may find.”

Nurzhanov provides an optimistic feeling in the classroom. Brombaugh believes that she has a  positive persona and displays a good attitude about her class.

“She also frequently makes quick jokes, and will laugh at anything funny done or said by a student,” said Brombaugh. “She is generally always smiling in class.”

Brombaugh enjoys how Nurzhanov’s curriculum and teaching style encourages independence in addition to being fun and engaging.

“Her teaching style is mostly letting students perform independent but structured work,” said Brombaugh. “We generally work using an online source called CodeHS which provides us with instruction, order, and projects.”

Nurzhanov is excited for implementing these skills in girls. She believes that because of today’s statistics, it is more critical than ever for girls to participate in STEM.

“[I read a book over the summer that said] 15 percent of girls enrolled in colleges choose STEM studies, and 50 percent of them leave after their first year,” said Nurzhanov. “To me it [meant that] we need to educate girls the skills to be successful in life.”

Nurzhanov expresses optimism about helping today’s girl generation participate in computer science.

“It’s a new time, it’s not where girls are seen as having traditional jobs,” said Nurzhanov. “We are capable, right?”

Senior Abigail Quinsay is the founder of the Girls Who Code Club, which meets every Wednesday from 3:30-5:30 after school. She works with Mrs. Nurzhanov and a mentor in order to establish and work on coding projects.

I really admire her motivation,” said Quinsay. “When we have meetings, she likes to sit with the students and is basically a member of the club too. I can tell that she is very interested in learning about computer science and I like that.”

There are some personal things Nurzhanov wants to share with the community, such as the Russian culture. Nurzhanov has a lot experience with Russian culture and opened up a Russian Thursday club for the 2016-17 year.

“I think Russian culture is relevant today,” said Nurzhanov, “Russian aviation and aerospace [programs] have international significance.”

RAHS freshman Alex Crawford attends Russian Club; he is half Russian and enjoys to learn about his heritage and culture.

“She has more experience because she’s from Russia,” said Crawford. “She can talk about self experience.”

Last year, many students knew Nuka Nurzhanov as the Dean of Students. This year, she is the Class of 2021’s Aviation English and Computer Programming class teacher, and an advisor for Russian Club and the Girls Who Code Club.

Nurzhanov is excited to teach literature this year, as well as her other classes and clubs. She enjoys her students and the creativity and opinions they bring to class.

“I love my students; I love learning from my students,” said Nurzhanov. “I love new and fresh perspectives when students share their perspectives and their interesting ways of implementing the projects and unique creations.”

In addition to loving her students, Nurzhanov is passionate about literature. Nurzhanov wants to work on the perfect curriculum to combine that passion in the context of aerospace and aviation.

“I love literature; my favorite [genres] are European classics, Russian classics, and I love science fiction,” said Nurzhanov. “I need to be creative and to put that [literature] as a subject in the context of aerospace and aviation to share the mission of this school.”

Nurzhanov is also very excited about her Computer Programming class. She acknowledges the importance of tech skills gained from that curriculum and wants to share that with the RAHS community.

“[Computer science skills] will help you to advance your life, to get a better job, [and] to have a better career.” said Nurzhanov.

Sophomore Mollie Brombaugh goes to Nurzhanov’s Computer Science class ready for coding activities and snacks.

“She [Nurzhanov] demonstrates great motivation to learn and assist in any way she can,” said Brombaugh. “This includes bringing us snacks and encouraging us to show off our work, knowledge, and any other fun things we may find.”

Nurzhanov provides an optimistic feeling in the classroom. Brombaugh believes that she has a  positive persona and displays a good attitude about her class.

“She also frequently makes quick jokes, and will laugh at anything funny done or said by a student,” said Brombaugh. “She is generally always smiling in class.”

Brombaugh enjoys how Nurzhanov’s curriculum and teaching style encourages independence in addition to being fun and engaging.

“Her teaching style is mostly letting students perform independent but structured work,” said Bombaugh. “We generally work using an online source called CodeHS which provides us with instruction, order, and projects.”

Nurzhanov is excited for implementing these skills in girls. She believes that because of today’s statistics, it is more critical than ever for girls to participate in STEM.

“[I read a book over the summer that said] 15 percent of girls enrolled in colleges choose STEM studies, and 50 percent of them leave after their first year,” said Nurzhanov. “To me it [meant that] we need to educate girls the skills to be successful in life.”

Nurzhanov expresses optimism about helping today’s girl generation participate in computer science.

“It’s a new time, it’s not where girls are seen as having traditional jobs,” said Nurzhanov. “We are capable, right?”

Senior Abigail Quinsay is the founder of the Girls Who Code Club, which meets every Wednesday from 3:30-5:30 after school. She works with Mrs. Nurzhanov and a mentor in order to establish and work on coding projects.

I really admire her motivation,” said Quinsay. “When we have meetings, she likes to sit with the students and is basically a member of the club too. I can tell that she is very interested in learning about computer science and I like that.”

There are some personal things Nurzhanov wants to share with the community, such as the Russian culture. Nurzhanov has a lot experience with Russian culture and opened up a Russian Thursday club for the 2016-17 year.

“I think Russian culture is relevant today,” said Nurzhanov, “Russian aviation and aerospace [programs] have international significance.”

RAHS freshman Alex Crawford attends Russian Club; he is half Russian and enjoys to learn about his heritage and culture.

“She has more experience because she’s from Russia,” said Crawford. “She can talk about self experience.”

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