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Advanced Picking of class choices

This is an example a schedule for the typical RAHS junior. Before the end of May, you will be picking your classes that will play a factor in determining your schedule next year.

With the sheets for picking classes coming within the next couple of weeks, students are feeling the pinch in deciding what classes they need to take. Everything from late arrivals to early dismissals, from AP classes to electives. Katie Carper, guidance counselor and schedule making extraordinaire, gives her advice for when you fill out that class choice list.

Q: When it comes to knowing how many you should take to knowing which classes you’re prepared for, how should students go about picking AP classes?

A: You should pick AP classes that you’re strong in and that you enjoy that way you’ll be motivated to do the work because it is extra work and you’ll find it interesting and exciting, rather than spending all your time just because you think it’s going to look good on your transcript.The rule of thumb is to take the most challenging courses you can and that you have a chance at being successful in that fits your own interests. I feel like four and five AP classes should not be the norm. If you want to work your tail off at things that don’t come easy to you, go ahead and sign up, but I think we have many classes of upperclassmen that that’s definitely not right for the number of kids that take it on. My recommendation for students who I think are biting off more than they can chew is to always talk to the teacher. Our AP teachers are not easy graders, so if it’s something that you already struggle with I would not recommend it. If you’re struggling through your sophomore year, you should probably think about how many AP classes you want to take, juniors too. There’s no shame in that, not everyone can be extremely strong and passionate about everything. You can decide to over “enroll” yourself all you want, but we think you should have time to play sports and have hobbies and go to fun events and be an executive officer. Those are all important to colleges too.

Q: Sometimes students work to their limits in hope that their senior year will have less work for them. They want to end their high school career on an easier note. What would you say about students that want that easy year?

A: Let’s put some myths to rest. You can’t have a free period. You can’t have more than one peer tutor period in the day. Really, at most, obviously this is not ideal, one of those, one of the two. And you should chose. I would never tell a student to take a late arrival or early release or peer tutor a period unless that was the only thing they had the ability to take. We try to avoid students having late arrival and peer tutor because it doesn’t look great, unless you balance it out with things like Science Olympiad, Robotics, some things outside the day. But if you want to take an “easy senior year,” your next year will reflect that. If your goal doesn’t require you to take six challenging courses, okay. As much as we don’t want students to overload themselves, in a way that’s unhealthy, we don’t want people not taking academic courses because they’re finished with their credits.

Q: What about the myths that AP classes are necessary to get into my college of choice? Should I make the time commitment? Will AP classes be a for sure way to get into my top choice?

A: Schedules are important, and they’re a personal decision, and if you have a well-rounded list of goals and colleges for the future, you’re schedule should not prevent you from achieving them in the future. If we’re talking about tier one colleges and academies, that’s one thing, they’re important and they’re great goals, but you want to make sure that you’re not sacrificing two years of your life for something that has an 8% acceptance rate. If you’re someone that will have to, you want to make sure you’re okay with paying that price. I can see why there is pressure, but it’s totally pressure that you’re putting on each other.  If you’re in over your head (it’s not my favorite thing in the world), but you do have two weeks to drop classes. If you want to drop after that (hopefully you all know this) it’s teacher discretion to how that goes, and for some students that makes sense, keep that in mind. Make changes early. We don’t want you in a position where you think you’re going to fail in the very end.

Q: What about the teachers that almost “guilt-trip” us into taking their classes? How do we tell teachers that we’re not ready for their AP class?

A: It’s unfortunate if people are getting blanketed advice that everyone should take their class, but hopefully students are able to make the right decision for them in spite of that. It’s really difficult when it’s a teacher that you really respect. I think it’s great and a good experience to be able to go to a teacher and say “I love to, but I do all these other things, and it’s not right for me right now.” Hopefully, your teachers aren’t bullying you after saying that. A lot of it is, teachers will say something and not realize that students are hearing as a directive.

Q: Do you have any general advice about balancing everything between academic and social life, and overloading yourself?

A: If you’re working and playing two sports, have an internship and a million other things, you have to look at your whole life. Obviously we think that school should be an important part of that, but sometimes you need to evaluate your life and see if it’s working for you. Again, not in the context “I wish I could sleep two hours a night, look perfect on paper, and go to Yale,” that’s a great goal, but you want to accept that you’re human. You can always work harder and get smarter, but it’s not magical. We hope that students are making the right decision for them and getting good advice. I know parents, teachers, and me have heavily advised against it and students have gone and done it anyway. I don’t think that imposing a limit would address that issue. Plus, you guys are getting older you need to know what happens when you do that and that it’s real and you need to be able to make those choices on your own.

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Navigating RAHS registration

An example of a schedule for the typical RAHS junior. Before the end of May, students will be picking their classes that will play a factor in determining their schedule next year.

With the sheets for picking classes coming within the next couple of weeks, students are feeling the pinch in deciding what classes they need to take. Everything from late arrivals to early dismissals, from AP classes to electives. Katie Carper, guidance counselor and schedule making extraordinaire, gives her advice for when you fill out that class choice list.

 

Q: When it comes to knowing how many you should take to knowing which classes you’re prepared for, how should students go about picking AP classes?

A: You should pick AP classes that you’re strong in and that you enjoy that way you’ll be motivated to do the work because it is extra work and you’ll find it interesting and exciting, rather than spending all your time just because you think it’s going to look good on your transcript.The rule of thumb is to take the most challenging courses you can and that you have a chance at being successful in that fits your own interests. I feel like four and five AP classes should not be the norm. If you want to work your tail off at things that don’t come easy to you, go ahead and sign up, but I think we have many classes of upperclassmen that that’s definitely not right for the number of kids that take it on. My recommendation for students who I think are biting off more than they can chew is to always talk to the teacher. Our AP teachers are not easy graders, so if it’s something that you already struggle with I would not recommend it. If you’re struggling through your sophomore year, you should probably think about how many AP classes you want to take, juniors too. There’s no shame in that, not everyone can be extremely strong and passionate about everything. You can decide to over “enroll” yourself all you want, but we think you should have time to play sports and have hobbies and go to fun events and be an executive officer. Those are all important to colleges too.

 

Q: Sometimes students work to their limits in hope that their senior year will have less work for them. They want to end their high school career on an easier note. What would you say about students that want that easy year?

A: Let’s put some myths to rest. You can’t have a free period. You can’t have more than one peer tutor period in the day. Really, at most, obviously this is not ideal, one of those, one of the two. And you should chose. I would never tell a student to take a late arrival or early release or peer tutor a period unless that was the only thing they had the ability to take. We try to avoid students having late arrival and peer tutor because it doesn’t look great, unless you balance it out with things like Science Olympiad, Robotics, some things outside the day. But if you want to take an “easy senior year,” your next year will reflect that. If your goal doesn’t require you to take six challenging courses, okay. As much as we don’t want students to overload themselves, in a way that’s unhealthy, we don’t want people not taking academic courses because they’re finished with their credits.

 

Q: What about the myths that AP classes are necessary to get into my college of choice? Should I make the time commitment? Will AP classes be a for sure way to get into my top choice?

A: Schedules are important, and they’re a personal decision, and if you have a well-rounded list of goals and colleges for the future, you’re schedule should not prevent you from achieving them in the future. If we’re talking about tier one colleges and academies, that’s one thing, they’re important and they’re great goals, but you want to make sure that you’re not sacrificing two years of your life for something that has an 8% acceptance rate. If you’re someone that will have to, you want to make sure you’re okay with paying that price. I can see why there is pressure, but it’s totally pressure that you’re putting on each other.  If you’re in over your head (it’s not my favorite thing in the world), but you do have two weeks to drop classes. If you want to drop after that (hopefully you all know this) it’s teacher discretion to how that goes, and for some students that makes sense, keep that in mind. Make changes early. We don’t want you in a position where you think you’re going to fail in the very end.

 

Q: What about the teachers that almost “guilt-trip” us into taking their classes? How do we tell teachers that we’re not ready for their AP class?

A: It’s unfortunate if people are getting blanketed advice that everyone should take their class, but hopefully students are able to make the right decision for them in spite of that. It’s really difficult when it’s a teacher that you really respect. I think it’s great and a good experience to be able to go to a teacher and say “I love to, but I do all these other things, and it’s not right for me right now.” Hopefully, your teachers aren’t bullying you after saying that. A lot of it is, teachers will say something and not realize that students are hearing as a directive.

 

Q: Do you have any general advice about balancing everything between academic and social life, and overloading yourself?

A: If you’re working and playing two sports, have an internship and a million other things, you have to look at your whole life. Obviously we think that school should be an important part of that, but sometimes you need to evaluate your life and see if it’s working for you. Again, not in the context “I wish I could sleep two hours a night, look perfect on paper, and go to Yale,” that’s a great goal, but you want to accept that you’re human. You can always work harder and get smarter, but it’s not magical. We hope that students are making the right decision for them and getting good advice. I know parents, teachers, and me have heavily advised against it and students have gone and done it anyway. I don’t think that imposing a limit would address that issue. Plus, you guys are getting older you need to know what happens when you do that and that it’s real and you need to be able to make those choices on your own.

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B-Boys breaking down barriers

Bopping their way to the top, B-Boy Club takes a spin on the meaning of having a dance club. New to the list of Thursday clubs, this crew of students is unlike the usual STEM clubs at RAHS and is working to get the student body more involved in the arts.

Fearless leaders, senior Felix Tran and junior Brandon Vallin, have taken inspiration from the multiple dance circles that occasionally occurred during lunch hours, and made an official time of the school day.

“My bro, Brandon Vallin, and I met last year, and we sessioned [danced] together and formed a pretty strong friendship through B-Boying,” said Tran. “This year I started B-Boy Club as a small group on Facebook, but Brandon was able to get permission from school and here we are with the official school club.”

Tran and Vallin were surprised at the early acceptance by the administration for the placement of a directly art-related club supervised by math teacher, Karen Wilson. With the increasing emphasis on STEM with the move to the new school, the idea of a new dance club seemed far-fetched at the time.

“I understand our strong goals and aspirations toward STEM education, but a little more emphasis on it [the arts] would be nice in my opinion,” said Tran. “A well-balanced curriculum, not only just focusing on STEM.”

As it turns out, they were welcomed with open arms. At the beginning of the year, during the sign-up for the Thursday clubs, the young club nearly reached the maximum number of students. To Vallin, this came as a surprise.

“There were a good number of people that wanted something like this,” said Vallin. “They loved the idea of combining breakdancing and school all in the same day and location.”

Day and location were most likely the deciding factors, but it was the message and theme that made this club stand out among all of the other clubs during that sign-up day.

“I think our club really brings something new,” said Tran. “You don’t see that many dancers at this school…We bring a new community and experience to our school’s atmosphere.”

Both leaders of this club believe that this could provide another artistic outlet that the school needs. Tran says that it is a combination of the business atmosphere and physical activity.

While that’s one major advantage, Vallin also thinks that its availability can prove to be an opportunity.

“My plan is to make [B-Boy Club] open to everyone,” said Vallin. “We just want to prove that anyone could learn.”

However, B-Boy Club isn’t stopping at Thursday club time slots. They’re figuring out a way to make the most of the club and really involve as many members that they can—not just the thirty two-student maximum.

“We’ll probably start up a jam as a fundraiser for the club,” said Tran. “Posters. Events. Get that all on Facebook too. Just get it all up in people’s faces. But we won’t force them. We’re just an open door of opportunity that people can definitely feel free to enter and join in on this amazing experience.”

As for first steps, Vallin says that they’re going to try to make an after school club that could meet up weekly and come up with more ideas about how to get students involved and make the club more prominent in the school community.

Vallin and Tran have started their dance club journey here at RAHS, but both of them started their interest in B-Boy dancing differently. Vallin first became interested in middle school and learned from there, spending time practicing with friends.

Tran also learned from friends, but his serious dancing experience started here. His dancing experience started with an early dance troupe made up of John Paul Pilapil, Phillip Liu, and himself.

“I didn’t start off a pro, I only knew about 2-3 moves and only had my carpet-floored room to practice in,” said Tran, “but after a few years of progress, I finally got back into it ‘officially.’”

 

Open post

B-Boys breaking down barriers

Bopping their way to the top, B-Boy Club takes a spin on the meaning of having a dance club. New to the list of Thursday clubs, this crew of students is unlike the usual STEM clubs at RAHS and is working to get the student body more involved in the arts.

Fearless leaders, senior Felix Tran and junior Brandon Vallin, have taken inspiration from the multiple dance circles that occasionally occurred during lunch hours, and made an official time of the school day.

“My bro, Brandon Vallin, and I met last year, and we sessioned [danced] together and formed a pretty strong friendship through B-Boying,” said Tran. “This year I started B-Boy Club as a small group on Facebook, but Brandon was able to get permission from school and here we are with the official school club.”

Tran and Vallin were surprised at the early acceptance by the administration for the placement of a directly art-related club supervised by math teacher, Karen Wilson. With the increasing emphasis on STEM with the move to the new school, the idea of a new dance club seemed far-fetched at the time.

“I understand our strong goals and aspirations toward STEM education, but a little more emphasis on it [the arts] would be nice in my opinion,” said Tran. “A well-balanced curriculum, not only just focusing on STEM.”

As it turns out, they were welcomed with open arms. At the beginning of the year, during the sign-up for the Thursday clubs, the young club nearly reached the maximum number of students. To Vallin, this came as a surprise.

“There were a good number of people that wanted something like this,” said Vallin. “They loved the idea of combining breakdancing and school all in the same day and location.”

Day and location were most likely the deciding factors, but it was the message and theme that made this club stand out among all of the other clubs during that sign-up day.

“I think our club really brings something new,” said Tran. “You don’t see that many dancers at this school…We bring a new community and experience to our school’s atmosphere.”

Both leaders of this club believe that this could provide another artistic outlet that the school needs. Tran says that it is a combination of the business atmosphere and physical activity.

While that’s one major advantage, Vallin also thinks that its availability can prove to be an opportunity.

“My plan is to make [B-Boy Club] open to everyone,” said Vallin. “We just want to prove that anyone could learn.”

However, B-Boy Club isn’t stopping at Thursday club time slots. They’re figuring out a way to make the most of the club and really involve as many members that they can—not just the thirty two-student maximum.

“We’ll probably start up a jam as a fundraiser for the club,” said Tran. “Posters. Events. Get that all on Facebook too. Just get it all up in people’s faces. But we won’t force them. We’re just an open door of opportunity that people can definitely feel free to enter and join in on this amazing experience.”

As for first steps, Vallin says that they’re going to try to make an after school club that could meet up weekly and come up with more ideas about how to get students involved and make the club more prominent in the school community.

Vallin and Tran have started their dance club journey here at RAHS, but both of them started their interest in B-Boy dancing differently. Vallin first became interested in middle school and learned from there, spending time practicing with friends.

Tran also learned from friends, but his serious dancing experience started here. His dancing experience started with an early dance troupe made up of John Paul Pilapil, Phillip Liu, and himself.

“I didn’t start off a pro, I only knew about 2-3 moves and only had my carpet-floored room to practice in,” said Tran, “but after a few years of progress, I finally got back into it ‘officially.’”

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No time to be a family guy

RAHS students quickly realize that the contract they signed at the beginning of freshman year includes spending many early mornings and late nights at RAHS. With school taking priority, people with a lot of activities don’t have time or the energy left for their families.

 

According to the Student Handbook, RAHS is known by the public for “preparing all students for college, career, and citizenship through a rigorous and relevant course of study,” but this often translates to the students as an overbearing workload.

 

For the kids in special situations such as those who do not live at home, this takes an even bigger toll.

 

“I have so much homework on the weekend that I can’t even skype with [my family],” said Yehya Elmasry, sophomore exchange student from Egypt who is quickly adjusting to the RAHS lifestyle.

 

Elmasry is not alone. Students are forced to become expert time managers once their four year countdown starts. To make the balancing act even tougher, it is the norm at RAHS to join clubs and do extracurricular activities.

 

“So I wake up at 4:30, get ready for school,” said Grace Cieszkiewicz, a senior known for mastery of time management. “Jazz band starts at 6:30, symphonic band starts at 7:30 and that goes until 8:20. Then I catch the bus from Highline to Aviation. Then I enjoy a regular school day. Then robotics starts at 6.”

 

Cieszkiewicz has the overwhelming-themselves-with-stuff bug that RAHS students are infected with. It is not uncommon for RAHS students to deal with multiple activities, as unlike most teenagers, the students here have a crazy hunger for learning.

 

“It gives a very sick twisted sense of euphoria whenever I get more work,” said Ethan Hunt, a junior who is taking three AP classes and is a devout Robotics member. “What is the point of school without work?”

While the “high” on school work will take up most of the time of RAHS students, there are serious drawbacks. Studies done by Pew Research Center (nonpartisan American demographic research center) have discovered that 33% of parents don’t spend enough time with their children which is most likely reciprocated with students at RAHS.

 

“You start noticing how you’re becoming distanced from your parents more and more as you become busy,” said Cieszkiewicz, “making time in my schedule for parent interaction is really important to me and I’ve been trying to do that more.”

 

Luckily, this time of the year provides that extra time that everyone is craving to be with their family.

 

A vast majority of RAHS students use the holiday break to catch up with their family, but many others end up using their time to finish all of the work that needs to be done in time for school.

“I’d like there to be some sort of cubicle that I could do school work in away from people,” said Hunt. “I love spending time with my niece and nephew, but sometimes my family is like nutmeg, a little bit is fun, but just a tad too much is overwhelming.”

There’s a fine line between spending time with family and keeping up with classes for RAHS students. According to Hannah Tobin, a sophomore who often travels back home to Wenatchee, homework takes up a lot of her family time.

 

“It doesn’t completely make up for [the lost family time], just going home on the weekends,” said Tobin, “but it helps a lot more than someone would think because actually [spending time with them] makes it all the better.”

 

Tobin, like many other RAHS students, will do a little stressing and a little relaxing this upcoming holiday break.

 

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Ladies fight to get a disc in the door

With another Ultimate Frisbee season well underway, the girls of the RAHS team have once again been asked to take to the benches once again. There aren’t enough girls playing Ultimate Frisbee at RAHS to have an all girl team.  The female minority on the team no longer want to wait on the sidelines and watch the boys, so they are upping their recruiting efforts, reaching out to younger players and getting into the game with the boys as much as possible.

 

Nonetheless, there are still no current plans for a girls season this year, and many girls returning to the game this year are disappointed that the chance of having their own season is farfetched.

 

“No, it doesn’t seem fair that guys get their own league,” said Teal Dowd, senior and veteran player of the Ultimate team. “It seems like it would make sense for the boys and girls to both play.”

 

Recruitment is one of the biggest obstacles for the girls team. Right now, the team has only around 12 girls on the roster, with a regular core of 5-6 consistent players, but they can’t compete without at least 15 for any given game, 25 for tournaments, and as many as 40 to sustain a competitive all-girls team. Despite ongoing outreach to more female players, the number of girls on the team has not grown much since last season, effectively excluding the current girls from participating fully in the sport.

 

“The main reason we don’t get to go to tournaments, like the Seattle Girls Invite, is because we don’t have enough [girls].” said Abby Jarve, a senior on the RAHS Frisbee team.

 

Another challenge is league rules that require separate boys and girls teams, in order to meet regulatory requirements for varsity sports. In order to meet these standards, the league that RAHS plays in does not let girls and boys play at the same time. This has led to some difficult choices for the team.

 

Last year, boys got their own season in the fall, and spring season is coed, leaving the girls with no season of their own. Even though the boys got their own season, there were still coed practices. This year the team pursued coed practices, allowing both genders to prepare for a coed spring season.

 

“By having coed practices, RAHS was prohibited from participating in any [league] games,” said Paul Illian, coach of the RAHS Ultimate team. “In this case, the boys sacrificed their season to support the girls’ efforts to prepare for the spring.”

 

While the RAHS girls continue to keep their hopes up, the truth is many team policies concerning practices, competitions, and team structure are not up to individual teams or coaches.

 

“No other schools have girls teams in the fall, we’re the only school that coaches girls in the fall,” said Coach Illian. “It’s because DiscNW does not have a girls or a coed league in the fall…Each group [DiscNW] tries to offer something else, and tries to not step on the toes of what the other group does, so sometimes there are dropouts and this is one.”

 

Another concern for the team is that  girls don’t get as many opportunities to get their PE credit. Many players may consider joining Frisbee because it’s fun, but for others it is the only option in attaining those hours, which are required to graduate high school.

 

“Freshmen need to be aware that you need to obtain PE credit on your own time,” said Dowd. “If they really see the need…to get their PE hours in, I think more girls will join.”

 

A healthy player base for a competitive team is 40 players of each gender, but the RAHS team has less than 40 players combined of both genders, and efforts are now under way to bring more girls into the team and create more opportunities for all RAHS players.

 

On Oct. 9, the girls of the Frisbee team joined with ASB and talked about the need for more players. The ladies of the team also addressed a freshman class assembly to explain the impact Frisbee has had on them in an attempt to garner more interest from the girls.

 

“I think if we could also use Facebook and other online sources where everyone could see,” says Jarve, “it could start getting the message out, especially to the girls.”

 

The chance for improvement in performance at games and tournaments is quite high, and in doing well, the Frisbee team can bring a different kind of pride to the school than the regular “Sports of the Mind.”

 

“My goal is to have a group of players,” says Coach Illian, “so we have a pool of talent so we can meet any playing opportunity.”

 

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The Bite of Aviation

Map showing all the great food places that are worth checking out once AHS is comfortable at the new school.
Photo by: Gabby Rivera

When AHS moves to its new location next year students will be losing the comfort of having a nearby Subway and QFC, but there is no need to worry! There are some gold mines waiting for the tastebuds of teenagers to come and check them out.

 

“I like the restaurants that are near our school now,” said Cynthia Tran, an AHS sophomore eagerly awaiting her turn to go off-campus for lunch, “but, as far as I know, there aren’t that many places over there [at the new school].”

 

Have no fear! There are plenty of places to go, tucked away in Georgetown and maybe even South Park. Here are some locations that will help you when you want something quick and on the go!

 

If you want American classics, there are a few places that will satisfy the hunger for American burgers and hotdogs. Matt’s Famous Chili Dogs, a simple five minutes from the school, has a variety of different hot-dogs and burgers.

 

“We have really high quality hot dogs,” said Matt Jones, owner of Matt’s Famous Chili Dogs. “We have chili that I bet any student at Aviation High School would like to have. Our chili cheese fries are also a pretty popular item.”

 

Jones knows about Aviation’s tight lunch period, and thinks that his restaurant’s quick service will really come in handy for the students who are pressed for time.

 

Another place to go to, just a few blocks down, is Randy’s. This former Denny’s was converted to a new restaurants with walls of aviation memorabilia and is known for its friendly service and historical feel.

 

“The food is good too,” said Charles J., a popular critic on Yelp!. “The clam chowder alone is worth coming back for.”

 

If you’re getting out of school a little late, both of these restaurants have take-out so you can call ahead and let them know what you want to eat.

 

But if you’re really looking for a different cup of tea, or perhaps even coffee, a place to definitely check out would be Espresso by Design. Six minutes from the Museum of Flight, this little shop in Georgetown offers a range of quick pick-ups.

 

“The coffee is delicious, in that unique way that Starbucks doesn’t have,” said a known food critic on Yelp!, Cynthia L., “I love that they have the green Superfood, fresh cut fruit cups, quiches, pudding, cookies, bagels and everything that you wished Starbucks had.”

 

It is a bit on the tricky side when it comes to finding the place–much less parking there–but when you do find the place you will be greeted by their ever-so-friendly staff and owner.

 

Sometimes you’ll even crave the authentic Asian cuisine. While teriyaki and other Japanese take-out is good, it is not always the most convenient food to get when you are in the lunch rush. There are plenty of teriyaki woks nearby the new school, but that could get kind of boring after awhile.

 

Katsu Burger takes Japanese inspired cuisine and makes it and combines it with the accessibility of American style food. This five minute drive from the new school combines the two differing cultures, and is known for its bizarre and unique food items.

 

“We deep fry all of our burgers, and they are all amazing,” said Katsu Burger, “you can choose from beef, pork, chicken, or tofu for any burger.  It should also be noted that our burgers are HUGE.  So if someone wants something not quite as big, they can get Banzai Bites (bite sized pieces of chicken) or Kushikatsu (pork, onion, and pineapple on skewers).”

 

They are excited to meet many of the Aviation students that will be coming to their restaurant, so they are trying to think of many ways to make getting lunch as easy and quick as possible.

 

“To save time, it would be smart for you to call ahead with your order,” said Katsu Burger,  “because we make everything to order, it can take between 10-15 minutes to make up your food.”

 

To all the rumors that there will be nowhere to eat next year, fear not! There are plenty of restaurants near the new school hidden on untraveled roads. Check out some of these places, grab some food, and don’t forget to mention you’re from AHS.

 

 

Project Amelia takes flight

AHS students plan to bring “girl power” to the school with Project Amelia, a campaign started by the Museum of Flight that aims to inspire women of all ages to get involved in the aviation field, but it’s going to need $1.4 million to get this plane to take off.Currently, there are no female oriented exhibits at the Museum. While there is a small section display honoring the women pilots of World War II, the Amelia exhibit will be the first complete and permanent exhibit to recognize pioneering women in aviation.When asked about whether or not Earhart’s Lockheed could be the start of getting more female-oriented exhibits, member of the Board of Trustees, Anne Simpson said, “that is the goal. I think along with our other educational programs and using Amelia as kind of that first carrot. That we will do that and will be successful.”Earhart’s Lockheed could be the start of getting more female-oriented exhibits in the Museum, encouraging for girls to participate in aviation.“We’re trying to reach out to the community,” said Simpson, “not just touch and tap into the people who’ve been so generous to the Museum of Flight. We think that this particular exhibit really talks to a broader group and will be of interest.”The restored Electra at the Museum would hopefully represent women’s impact in the aviation field, and in the future bring more and more to the Museum. Female aviators deserve representation at the Museum, besides the culminating area in the Personal Courage Wing, to pay tribute to years of contribution.

“Project Amelia means inspiration for anyone who comes to the Museum and sees the exhibit and the aircraft,” said Simpson. “This is for girls and young women. Amelia is more than just a pilot, she did just about anything, everything.”

Jaclyn Wing, AHS sophomore that is bringing Project Amelia to AHS, is focusing on getting the school involved in this campaign. She hopes that the school will raise enough money to not only make a bigger name for women in the aviation community, but also stress the importance of women in aviation.

While the Museum gets bigger donations from the adults, it is the younger generation that Project Amelia is really trying to get involved with the campaign. Wing has taken on that role, working with Caitlin O’Keefe—a Raisbeck Engineering employee who firmly supports Aviation—and Anne Simpson, a Board of Trustees member at the Museum, to find a way to get young people involved.

“There’s a lot of different ways in which you can try and get donations,” said O’Keefe, “and some of them are big and some of them are small, and everyone has to work together and try to touch all the demographics and to try and get donations in a way that works for your
program and works for the people you are targeting.”

Team Amelia plans to raise $1000 dollars, but if students don’t participate and get involved with the cause this may not happen. Students can’t get involved in the cause if the student population doesn’t know what’s going on.

“One of the biggest challenges organizations with a cause need to overcome when using social media is getting people to interact with you and care about your cause,” said O’Keefe. “The trick is getting people’s interest piqued so they want to engage with you online and be involved, and sometimes you have to go outside of social media to target people. Talking about how cool Project Amelia is at a school assembly would be a great way to do this.”

Team Amelia plans on directing its efforts towards the teenage demographic in its future plans. With the Movie Night in February already under wraps, Team Amelia still needs to earn money for AHS to even make a dent in the necessary $1.4 million.

“We have a Facebook page,” said Wing. “We also plan to sell bracelets and make t-shirts. It’s kind of the same types of things as other programs are doing our fundraiser is unique because the reason we are doing it is we don’t see a lot of women empowerment.”

Project Amelia had a turnout of thirty students attend the Pitch Perfect movie night, earning around $300. While that makes a dent in the AHS goal, there’s still a long way to go.

Changes in the Highline District

On January 3, 2012, Angelica Alvarez was elected as the new school board president, which may cause adjustments to be made at Aviation.

 Angelica Alvarez was the first Latina to join the school board back in 2010. Her goal when she first became part of the school board was to represent all children, no matter what race they may be or social or economic class they may be in. In addition, she wanted to  bridge the gap between early learning and entering the public school system.

 Alvarez also stated in a press conference that she’s interested in improving the transition from early childhood education to school (K-12), as well as building collaborative and inclusive relationships with parents.

 The school board president’s job  is to create agendas for school board meetings depending on what topics they think are of higher priority. The president also has the attention of the superintendent—currently, Alvarez is in the process of looking for one—and talks to them about what issues that the board comes up with.  

 Julie Burr, Coordinator of Work Based Learning at Aviation High School, served on the school board for four years and was elected school board president for one of those years.  She feels that it won’t be a difficult transition for Mrs. Alvarez, because all school board members have had many opportunities to observe and work with  the Vice President and President of the five person board before they are nominated and elected into these positions themselves.

The decisions that the board makes are in the interest of the students, so no matter what they decide, the students will be affected. It is advised that when students dislike a decision made by the school board, they should talk to them.

 “Sometimes if there are things that the students learn about that they feel passionate about,” says Burr,  “they are very effective. When the students show up at school board meetings, that school board listens.”

There is not a concern about what the new school board president may do at Aviation.

“I have no concern at all about Ms. Alvarez serving as the board president and supporting Aviation High School,” says Aviation High School principal, Reba Gilman, “She has been supportive of the school during her tenure as a board member, and I think she is the type of person who will ask questions if she has concerns and listen well before making any critical decision.”

Celebrating “yaD etisoppO”

Juniors John Galiger, Cody Waugh, Gary Trujilllo pretend to participate in the much-wanted Backwards Day. Photo by: Max Wienke

The week of January 23rd is the next Spirit Week, and Aviation High School will celebrate a holiday that not everyone knows about.

There has always been confusion about when Opposite Day actually takes place. The official date for Opposite Day is the twenty-fifth of January.

“I did not know that Opposite Day was on that date,” said AHS freshman Jaclyn Wing, “but I do know that it is when you do most everything the opposite of what is normal.”

Everyone seems to know what it is, but not when it is. Although, people do not even notice the fact that they celebrate the spirit of Opposite Day all the time.

At Aviation the holiday is celebrated in a different way. The twenty-fifth of January falls coincidentally under the time Spirit Week is scheduled. There are many Spirit Days falling under the theme of “opposites” all leading up to Tolo.

Tolo, which happens on January 28th,  is opposite in itself. It is opposite from the traditional dances where boys ask girls,  this time girls have the opportunity to ask guys. The theme of Tolo is also opposite, it is Beauty and the Geek. ………

A Spirit Day during the week is Super Hero and Super Villan day. With the school representing themselves as do-gooders of main stream comics as well as the malevolent creatures that cause chaos over the cities, they show the opposite forces of good and bad.

According to ASB, other spirit days that pertain to opposite-ness, although it wasn’t exactly planed that way.

“I personally did not realize that Opposite Day was during the week,” said sophomore class captain, Royce Le,  “it is all one big coincidence. Fake Injury Day is different from the norm because it is a fun way for students to experience a different perspective they never had before, a handicap worked into their normal day life. Animal Day is opposite from the normal, professional dress code, our peers get to break free from the chain of collectivism and experience to be wild animals and make a statement as an individual.”

Now that some students have heard about the existence of Opposite Day  they want to take part in it.

“I think that Superhero/supervillian Day will be the best out of all the spirit days,” says freshman Cynthia Tran, “I’m still planning on my outfit for the day, but I do plan on going a little crazy. I think that most students will participate in it because, I mean, who doesn’t want to become a superhero/supervillian for a day?!”

After hearing about the day, students think it would be interesting if ASB took a more literal approach with the holiday rather than the diverse, creative ways like Superhero Supervillian Day.  They want a day that is specifically an Opposite Day.

“I do think that the school should do something for it,” says Wing, “because it would be another fun way for the students to be involved in school without becoming a part of a club or other activities.”

ASB has not scheduled a Spirit Day that is an actual Opposite Day for the week that leads up to the dance, but now knowing that students find the theme interesting and fun they are considering the idea of Opposite Day for next year.

“All days recommended are always in our minds when we consider and choose spirit days,” said Le, “and it will definitely be added to the list.”

Some of the ideas that students have about a potential spirit day with the opposite theme include all the classes going backwards (sixth would be first, fifth would be second, etc) or people wearing their cloths backwards.

However, other students do not agree with this and think that the school should not do anything to celebrate the holiday.

“I think the worst part about Opposite Day,” said Aviation freshman Emilio Anselmo, “is the fact that at our school, we tend to be a little bit crazy.”

Perhaps, that is the reason that ASB has not scheduled such an event because they feel that some students would go too far and make it un-fun for everyone else. If students were to go over board, whether it is through the appropriate-ness of the students’ dress or the amount of stress and anxiety they cause, it could make the student atmosphere a place where students do not really want to participate in. The purpose of spirit days are so that the student body has fun.

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