05302017 Headline:

Secret language discovered for mating couples

Explorer immerses self in the courting process

By Chris Hendrickson

Raisbeck Geographic has taken an in-depth look into the mating rituals of the tribesmen and what traditions they have in regards to courtship and reproduction.

Despite the surplus of males, due to the ancient battle among the females of the tribe, as investigated by Biologist Vincent Pierce, many females in the tribe refuse to mate. In fact, many females seem to be romantically committed to each other instead of with men. The same trend has been observed in the males of the tribe, who display seemingly sensual gestures towards each other, followed by the ritual saying of the phrase “noh-oh-moh.” I began my studies by embracing one of the male members of the tribe in one of these social gestures, and the tribesmen welcomed me into their society with their tribal-brethren term “bruh.”

Additionally, the ritual painting of female faces seems to have little to no correlation with the willingness to copulate, despite previous suspicions. It does seem that the younger members of the tribe are not as well versed in the technical skill of this painting. When I attempted to point this out to one of the individuals, she seemed to become upset with me, and her paintings began to run and smear.

One of the questions raised in our encounters has been the significance of the term “bay.” It is possible that the use of the term signifies the sexual orientation of the user of the word. It has been noted that females of the tribe refer to each other by this term in a very wide and varied way. In addition, females appear to be closely romantically involved. These interpersonal relationships do not seem to be monogamous, as females will usually act romantically towards a group of about five to ten girls, which they refer to as their “skwad.”

We postulate that these “skwads” of females are mating groups, whose goal is to prey upon the weak and separated males that cower from the more dominant females.

Based on my observations, I believe in this culture that kissing is some form of non-verbal communication with no patterns to whom they engage in the face-eating with. I observed a pair engaging in what seemed to be a philosophical inquiry one morning.

To further investigate into this hidden language, I approached a female to engage in this type of dialogue. She accepted, and while our exchange was brief, I do believe I was able to discern a glimpse of grammar.

Building on my discoveries, I attempted to join one of the vehement philosophical debates I witnessed between one of the older tribesmen and a younger female, as seems to be the usual case. In this effort, I was met with severe hostility, and I now believe that this form of communication to be a very private one, which cannot be interrupted.

By disguising myself as a native, I was able to further study this language by courting one of the red caste females, who seemed eager to commence in an allegorical debate. Through our unspoken discussions, I believe that I have begun to put together a vocabulary and a rough set of conjugation forms.

It appears that after the males and females of the Noitaiva commence their courtships, they progress to a point of mating, which seems to take place in the outside area inside the quadracycles. These sexual relations seem to be more as a recreational sort of activity than for reproductive purposes.

I was able to get very near one of these partitions in my studies, and I was able to very carefully document the course of the encounter. In my future expeditions, I hope to be able to participate first-hand in a recreational match such as this. Hopefully, I will be able to compare our two societies’ procedures and traditions regarding mating.

Editor’s Note: Mr. Hendrickson’s actions and interactions with the Noitaiva females are blatant violations of the anthropological code of conduct. We do not condone these actions and have reprimanded Mr. Hendrickson by removing him from the Raisbeck Geographic staff. The incidents among Q13 Fox remind us that direct contact with these native peoples can be dangerous to their society and our researches, potentially compromising the entire investigation. Despite these controversies, we have elected to publish Mr. Hendrickson’s findings, as they still promote intellectual discourse in regards to the Noitaiva.

 

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